Lynchburg Insulators

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Lynchburg Production Records

Dennis Bratcher

Production Charts:
Timeline by Week      Styles by Week

We have the advantage of access to production records for Lynchburg Glass Corporation. These were recovered from W. H. Loyd, Secretary and Treasurer and later President of Lynchburg Glass Corporation, by N. R. "Woody" Woodward in 1959 and provide a unique glimpse into insulator production at Lynchburg. Here, these records have been compiled into readable charts.* The first chart depicts a timeline of insulator production from late 1923 to mid-1925, in two phases. The second chart details specific production by insulator style for each week during the 51 weeks Lynchburg was making insulators and later fruit jars.

A few things to note about the records.

1. The dates given are for the week ending on that date. The plant ran six days a week beginning at midnight Sunday (for Monday production) until midnight Saturday, and production records summarized the preceding week's work. -1-

2. Statements from Lynchburg, for example in an advertisement (Employment Ad), say the plant started August 1, 1923. Yet the first production records begin with the week ending November 3, 1923. We do not know if it took those three months to get the plant into actual production, or whether insulators was made prior to October 29, 1923 and the records are incomplete. It is likely that the first insulators were made the week ending November 3, 1923.

3. From the Board Minutes it is almost certain that insulators were produced the week ending May 10, 1924, although none are listed in the Records.

4. In most cases the records give us numbers of insulators actually packed for sale, not the total number of insulators made. In a few cases the records offer a comparison between what was made, what was rejected, and the actual number packed for sale. For example we know from the records that 57% of the production run for the week ending March 22, 1924, 43,218 pieces, was rejected, presumably recycled. The records also note that about one third of the production for the week ending April 5, 1924 was also rejected. This was at a time when the company was trying to solve production problems.

5. Several style numbers are listed that do not correspond to lettering on any known Lynchburg insulators. Refer to Chart of Style and CD Numbers for further information on these.

6. The production dates of some styles are inconsistent with other documents. For example, in the document Comparison--Cost & Selling Price Insulators several styles are listed as being made in months that so not appear in the production records. This suggests that the production records as summarized below, while extensive, are not complete.

*These production statistics were complied from original Lynchburg production records and organized into charts by Dennis Bratcher. Because of deterioration of the records minor errors may be present and in some cases best estimates of illegible numbers were made. Access to the records courtesy Justin Stoudt.

Timeline of Production by Week

Chart of Production Timeline by Week -1-


*This chart is also available in Adode .pdf format.

By charting a timeline of insulator production, several aspects become more clear. We have to keep in mind that these records, while detailed, may not be complete. Also, it is uncertain whether Lynchburg-lettered insulators in clear and clear tinted were actually made at the Lynchburg plant, so they may not be included in the production totals (see Birmingham).

1. The first insulators recorded were made the week ending November 3, 1923 and the last were made May 23, 1925. However, there were none made the week ending March 9, 1924 and none are listed for the week ending March 29, 1924 as Lynchburg was trying to solve problems with the quality of the product and the high number of rejections. Also, the plant was shut down for seven months between April 5 and November 2, 1924 as the company tried once again to solve problems with quality, boost sales, and refinance the company.

2. Phase 1 production (Oct 29, 1923 to Apr 5, 1924) lasted 23 weeks (21 weeks of production). During this time, Lynchburg produced twelve of its fourteen total styles, lacking only the CD 181 and CD 306, which were both late additions to the lineup.

3. Phase 2 production (Nov 2, 1925 to May 23, 1925) lasted 30 weeks and produced ten styles. Dropped from production were the two small cables (CD 251 and CD 252), although Lynchburg replaced them with larger cables with less success (CD 180, CD 306). Also dropped were the Telegraph "Beehive" (CD 145), No. 48 (CD 153?), and the small Double Petticoat Pony (CD 160). We can assume that the CD 122 had replaced the CD 121 by this time. Production focused mainly on five key styles: small telephone (CD 106), telephone toll (CD 122), railroad signals (CD 154, CD 162), and low voltage power (CD 164), as well as the three sizes of fruit jars.

Detailed Production of Styles by Week

Chart of Production by Week

Dates Type Made Rejected Packed Gain/(Loss)
Oct 29 - Nov 30, 1923 No. 36 (CD 162)     7,478 no figures
  No. 44 (CD 154)     19,923  
  No. 38 (CD 164)     50,611  
  No. 140* (CD 160)     4,424  
  No. 90* ( CD 106)     40,304  
Dec 1 - Dec 31, 1923 No. 44 (CD 154)     495 no figures
  No. 620* (CD 252)     264  
  No. 36 (CD 162)     63,282  
  No. 38 (CD 164)     68,150  
  No. 140* (CD 160)     3,292  
  No. 620* (CD 252)     4,983  
  No. 160* (CD 121/122)     6,202  
  No. 44 (CD 154)     10,595  
  No. 90* ( CD 106)     151,466  
January 5, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     27,697 ($2,295.54)
  No. 38 (CD 164)     27,373  
  No. 44 (CD 154)     9.525  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     1,055  
  No. 10 (CD 106)     40,245  
January 12, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     33,506 ($914.44)
  No. 38 (CD 164)     28,192  
  No. 31 (CD 112)     2,527  
  No. 43 (CD 145)     4,587  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     13,023  
  No. 10 (CD 106)     57,466  
January 19, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     32,740 $411.81
  No. 38 (CD 164)     13,157  
  No 530 (CD 205)     14,027  
  No. 43 (CD 145)     2,961  
  No. 31 (CD 112)     14,704  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     19,332  
  No. 10 (CD 106)     52,231  
January 26, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     36,014 $250.89
  No. 38 (CD 164)     27,864  
  No. 44 (CD 154)     784  
  No. 160* (CD 121/122)     780  
  No. 31 (CD 112)     28,540  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     19,222  
  No. 10 (CD 106)     63,282  
February 2, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     36,485 $321.05
  No. 38 (CD 164)     26,242  
  No. 31 (CD 112)     26,898  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     15,569  
  No. 10 (CD 106)     67,815  
February 9, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     38,687 $784.85
  No. 38 (CD 164)     1,906  
  No. 48 (CD 153?)     24,717  
  No. 31 (CD 112)     15,630  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     26,574  
  No. 10 (CD 106)     65,634  
February 16, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     61,900 ($731.80)
  No. 48 (CD 153?)     20,735  
  No. 31 (CD 112)     15,393  
  No. 38 (CD 164)     3,325  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     24,022  
February 23, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     51,421 ($1,412.92)
  No. 48 (CD 153?)     3,323  
  No. 44 (CD 154)     19,929  
  No. 38 (CD 164)     15,306  
  No. 2 (CD 252)     18,989  
March 1, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     56,272 ($1,984.83)
  No. 44 (CD 154)     21,168  
  No. 30 (CD 121/122)     12,848  
  No. 1 (CD 251)     5,258  
  No. 38 (CD 164)     19,646  
March 8, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162)     47,724 ($1,322.55)
  No. 44 (CD 154)     32,263  
  No. 1 (CD 251)     3,538  
  No. 43 (CD 145)     14,267  
  No. 38 (CD 164)     22,582  
March 15, 1924 NO PRODUCTION       no figures
March 22, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162) 35,358 26,189 9,169 ($1,863.77)
  No. 44 (CD 154) 30,293 14,149 16,144  
  No. 43 (CD 145) 2,050 825 1,225  
  No. 38 (CD 164) 8,001 2,055 5,946  
March 29, 1924 NO PRODUCTION LISTED       ($1,625.27)
April 5, 1924 No. 36 (CD 162) 48,728 17,169 31,559 ($514.55)
  No. 38 (CD 164) 6,706 491 6,215  
  No. 32 (CD 160) 1,338 130 1,208  
  No. 44 (CD 154) 26,743 7,000 19,743  
May 10, 1924 NO PRODUCTION LISTED**        
Apr 7 - Nov 6, 1924 NO PRODUCTION        
(to be completed)          

* For additional information, see Chart of Style and CD Numbers
** The Board had approved restarting the plant this week to produce insulators for which on hand supplies were low or exhausted. While no production records exist for this week, apparently insulators were made because on May 10, 1924 Mr. Gayner reported to the Board that on-hand stocks were complete. Minutes, May 10, 1924

Notes

1. We know from comments by Mr. Gayner that the furnace was blocked (kept running but at reduced temperature) Saturday night and was not put back into production until Monday morning. Some workers came to the plant on Sunday morning to clean scum from the glass tank. J. William Gayner, "How To Get Rid of Scum on a Tank Melting Flint Bottle Glass," Presented at the Atlantic City Meeting of the American Ceramic Society (Glass Division), February, 1924, in Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Volume 7, Issue 3 (March 1924), p. 200.

 

Sample Weekly Production Summary Sheet, Week of January 19, 1924